Reclaim Earth

“According to a study from the University of Washington, the rift between healthy grub and junk food is wider than it’s ever been. Researchers were able to buy 2,000 calories of junk food for $3.52 — that’s an entire day’s caloric intake — where nutritious foods cost them a whopping $36 for the same 2,000 calories.”

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Food In The USA (via grandparemington)

 

(Source: maximilianyearsbc, via planetearthgreen)

mothernaturenetwork:

50 Cans campaign encourages teens to get creative, recycleDoSomething.org’s youth-led aluminum recycling drive helps the planet and gives teens a chance to win a $4,000 scholarship.

mothernaturenetwork:

50 Cans campaign encourages teens to get creative, recycle
DoSomething.org’s youth-led aluminum recycling drive helps the planet and gives teens a chance to win a $4,000 scholarship.

nrdc:

NRDC President, Frances Beinecke, joins Maya Lin for a discussion exploring the critical role artists, environmental advocates, and scientists play in addressing climate change. 

Marfa Dialogues/NY

Watch the live stream on Nov. 4th at 7:00PM EST here: www.nrdc.org/mdny

*Video courtesy of Maya Lin Studio and the What is Missing? Foundation

"These 10 Companies Control Enormous Number of Consumer Brands"(Graphic via Huffington Post)Corporate control is a crazy thing.

"These 10 Companies Control Enormous Number of Consumer Brands"(Graphic via Huffington Post)

Corporate control is a crazy thing.

Nice to see green walls down at the beach

Nice to see green walls down at the beach

mothernaturenetwork:

PHOTOS: What zoo captivity looks like around the world
Zoos are one of the more ethically dodgy areas for conservationists and animal lovers. On the one hand, there are many zoos doing amazing work, acting as the last refuge and hope for critically endangered species. And yet, there are also many zoos that act solely as a business to make money at the expense of caged animals.

See more.

Miami: We hold the future in our hands
This weekend I had the pleasure of attending Tropical Audubon Society’s Environmental Leadership Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to give citizens the skills necessary to be successful in environmental advocacy. The powerful speaker line-up boasted various environmental leaders including, former Dade County Commissioner Katy Sorenson, Senator Dwight Bullard, and of course Laura Reynolds, the director of TAS. Participants attended a series of lectures including diversity in conservation, smart growth, Everglades restoration and grassroots organizing. Not to mention the workshop’s stunning backdrop, Deering Estate at Cutler.
My favorite lecture was given by Maria Nardi, Chief of Planning and Research in the Miami Dade Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces Department. She discussed Dade County’s Open Space Master Plan, which proposes some amazing additions to improve Miami’s green spaces. The master plan includes the creation of a western buffer zone, which is essentially a linear wall of parks designed as a corridor to increase trail accessibility and recreational use. The plan also proposes a lovely system of connecting parks a.k.a. an ”emerald necklace”.
One other exciting component of the master plan is to create parks at our city transit stations. I think this is an excellent opportunity, not only to draw more people to use public transportation, but to possibly incorporate vertical gardens and green walls into the community.
It was inspiring to hear about local issues from citizens just like myself and from those who have made a career out of activism. There were leaders representing the inner city community of Overtown and from the Miccosukee Tribe—hearing these leaders speak resonated with me and certainly humanized our city’s environmental issues. 
The TAS workshop came at the perfect time to lift me out of the discouragement I feel as a result of post-grad job searching. I can’t remember a time when I felt this connected to the environmental cause here in Miami and it really reinforced my drive to make something happen. 
I recommend this workshop to anyone interested in learning about South Florida’s conservation issues. I think TAS is planning on making this an annual event and I encourage everyone to participate next year!
In the meantime, please join me at the next conservation meeting hosted by TAS at the Doc Thomas House. Meetings are held the 4th Wednesday of the month (October 23rd, 7:30pm). Call 305-667-7337 for more info. Thanks for reading!

Miami: We hold the future in our hands

This weekend I had the pleasure of attending Tropical Audubon Society’s Environmental Leadership Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to give citizens the skills necessary to be successful in environmental advocacy. The powerful speaker line-up boasted various environmental leaders including, former Dade County Commissioner Katy Sorenson, Senator Dwight Bullard, and of course Laura Reynolds, the director of TAS. Participants attended a series of lectures including diversity in conservation, smart growth, Everglades restoration and grassroots organizing. Not to mention the workshop’s stunning backdrop, Deering Estate at Cutler.

My favorite lecture was given by Maria Nardi, Chief of Planning and Research in the Miami Dade Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces Department. She discussed Dade County’s Open Space Master Plan, which proposes some amazing additions to improve Miami’s green spaces. The master plan includes the creation of a western buffer zone, which is essentially a linear wall of parks designed as a corridor to increase trail accessibility and recreational use. The plan also proposes a lovely system of connecting parks a.k.a. an ”emerald necklace”.

One other exciting component of the master plan is to create parks at our city transit stations. I think this is an excellent opportunity, not only to draw more people to use public transportation, but to possibly incorporate vertical gardens and green walls into the community.

It was inspiring to hear about local issues from citizens just like myself and from those who have made a career out of activism. There were leaders representing the inner city community of Overtown and from the Miccosukee Tribe—hearing these leaders speak resonated with me and certainly humanized our city’s environmental issues. 

The TAS workshop came at the perfect time to lift me out of the discouragement I feel as a result of post-grad job searching. I can’t remember a time when I felt this connected to the environmental cause here in Miami and it really reinforced my drive to make something happen

I recommend this workshop to anyone interested in learning about South Florida’s conservation issues. I think TAS is planning on making this an annual event and I encourage everyone to participate next year!

In the meantime, please join me at the next conservation meeting hosted by TAS at the Doc Thomas House. Meetings are held the 4th Wednesday of the month (October 23rd, 7:30pm). Call 305-667-7337 for more info. Thanks for reading!